COMING EXHIBITION

Insta-Correspondences

Insta-Correspondences  is an ongoing photographic project established by Caputo and Font since August, 2013. It intends to explore the possibility to build, through Instagram, a visual dialogue in the age of social media and hyper-connectivity. Re-thinking the almost disappeared post-card, the written note or the slow mail letter, we establish an immediate communication device and intend to find correspondences between the small, daily captures that we choose to reveal to the media. Aware of the constant bombarding of images that the world is facing, Insta-Correspondences places itself in between the romanticized decisive moment of photography and the technological immediacy of internet, crossing the bridge between public and private and questioning as well the role of mobil device driven images in the realm of art.

COMING EXHIBITION

Insta-Correspondences

Insta-Correspondences is an ongoing photographic project established by Caputo and Font since August, 2013. It intends to explore the possibility to build, through Instagram, a visual dialogue in the age of social media and hyper-connectivity. Re-thinking the almost disappeared post-card, the written note or the slow mail letter, we establish an immediate communication device and intend to find correspondences between the small, daily captures that we choose to reveal to the media. Aware of the constant bombarding of images that the world is facing, Insta-Correspondences places itself in between the romanticized decisive moment of photography and the technological immediacy of internet, crossing the bridge between public and private and questioning as well the role of mobil device driven images in the realm of art.

CURRENT EXHIBITION

Recalled a whisper is an installation by Mary Larsen of works on recycled computer floppy discs, remnants of this age of obsolescence and fitting forms for a new approach to artistic reclamation. The choice to use floppy discs began years ago as a way to recycle them, and has evolved into a medium she employs to create a non-linear narrative which explores ideas of identity and place. Individually, they are snippets of a life: dream-like landscapes that deal with struggles and fragmentations in personal relationships, where time is not linear, but layered or spatial. Often, she finds balance and harmony through imbalance and dissonance. By both obscuring and revealing words from the pages of books, found images, and maps, a new narrative emerges from the remains of another only to disappear. Larsen’s work combines abstraction, both painterly and geometric, with figurative elements, transcending the confines of artistic language to create her own personal vision.

CURRENT EXHIBITION

Recalled a whisper is an installation by Mary Larsen of works on recycled computer floppy discs, remnants of this age of obsolescence and fitting forms for a new approach to artistic reclamation. The choice to use floppy discs began years ago as a way to recycle them, and has evolved into a medium she employs to create a non-linear narrative which explores ideas of identity and place. Individually, they are snippets of a life: dream-like landscapes that deal with struggles and fragmentations in personal relationships, where time is not linear, but layered or spatial. Often, she finds balance and harmony through imbalance and dissonance. By both obscuring and revealing words from the pages of books, found images, and maps, a new narrative emerges from the remains of another only to disappear. Larsen’s work combines abstraction, both painterly and geometric, with figurative elements, transcending the confines of artistic language to create her own personal vision.

W38thStNYC
Cruising with an Eye and an iPhone
Two artists capture Fashion District life in the sounds and images of one block.
W38StNYC, a photo and video installation that simulates a lunchtime saunter down this block in the Fashion District, captures the atmosphere of the now-vanishing garment-producing neighborhood. Artists Diana Leidel and Cat Del Buono have teamed up to present ribbons of intimately-scaled digital images and videos that tell the story of Manhattan’s West 38th Street, from Seventh to Eighth Avenue, as experienced in the blink of an eye in a pedestrian’s daily routine. This block, at once gritty, glitzy and go-getting, populated by the humble, the striving and the super-successful fashion denizens, is at the heart of the relentlessly-paced fashion industry that has made New York a household word in style.
The artists recorded what they observed as they walked down the block—at the busy late lunchtime period––using the minimal, least invasive technology of an iPhone and Flip Camera. They did no post-shoot manipulation, so that there was no aesthetic “intervention” in the final product. Each of the images and videos reflects a single moment that passed quickly, and documents the remorseless activity of the street that defines the Fashion District.

W38thStNYC
Cruising with an Eye and an iPhone
Two artists capture Fashion District life in the sounds and images of one block.

W38StNYC, a photo and video installation that simulates a lunchtime saunter down this block in the Fashion District, captures the atmosphere of the now-vanishing garment-producing neighborhood. Artists Diana Leidel and Cat Del Buono have teamed up to present ribbons of intimately-scaled digital images and videos that tell the story of Manhattan’s West 38th Street, from Seventh to Eighth Avenue, as experienced in the blink of an eye in a pedestrian’s daily routine. This block, at once gritty, glitzy and go-getting, populated by the humble, the striving and the super-successful fashion denizens, is at the heart of the relentlessly-paced fashion industry that has made New York a household word in style.

The artists recorded what they observed as they walked down the block—at the busy late lunchtime period––using the minimal, least invasive technology of an iPhone and Flip Camera. They did no post-shoot manipulation, so that there was no aesthetic “intervention” in the final product. Each of the images and videos reflects a single moment that passed quickly, and documents the remorseless activity of the street that defines the Fashion District.

In this exhibition, Regina Jestrow presents work from a series of colorful geometric drawings that stem from her on-going interest in Folk Art Quilts.  The drawings are on paper and linen canvas with water-based media and embroidery.  She combines traditions and patterns from African-American, Amish, Hawaiian, and American quilt-making. Across many of these traditions, there is a story-telling connection about good and evil.  There was a once-common belief that human beings might offend God by making an earthly work too perfect and that evil traveled in straight lines.  Quilters would turn fabric pieces around, upside-down and backwards to break monotonous patterns. Regina borrows African-American quilt-making traditions such as the use of improvisation, contrast, multiple patterns, and shifts in scale, thus breaking up straight lines in order to ward off evil. These techniques and traditions create movement, pattern recognition, and nostalgia.
To quilt is to stitch, sew, and design with one’s own two hands. Regina’s work translates the movement of color and design, combining ideas from the traditional art of quilting and high art into her own personal geometric, organic, three-dimensional work.  Regina’s artistic practice is made up of experimentation with traditional needlework, colors, geometric patterns and textures. She learned many of her skills from her mother, who is an avid seamstress and knitter. After moving to Miami in 1999, she started quilting and sewing to express herself artistically. Regina’s pieces are influenced by and pay homage to the story-telling qualities in Americana quilts and how they can pass down skills and stories from generation to generation.  One of the common themes across all of her work is that it is pattern-driven.
Regina Jestrow (b. 1978, Queens, NY) learned how to sew as a child and has been creating quilts since 1999.  She graduated from High School of Art & Design and studied photography at Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. After moving to Miami, she purchased her first sewing machine.  She began taking printmaking classes at Miami-Dade College and Florida International University, and started showing work in galleries in 2008. Regina was a resident artist at the Bakehouse Art Complex from 2009-2011, where she first started to explore installation art. In May 2011 she was awarded a month-long residency at The Studios of Key West where she completed her first outdoor interactive installation in their public garden. Regina had a studio at ArtCenter/South Florida from 2011-2013 where she became more interested in interactive and performance art. In November 2014 she will be the resident fellow at The Artist in Residence in the Everglades (AIRIE).

In this exhibition, Regina Jestrow presents work from a series of colorful geometric drawings that stem from her on-going interest in Folk Art Quilts. The drawings are on paper and linen canvas with water-based media and embroidery. She combines traditions and patterns from African-American, Amish, Hawaiian, and American quilt-making. Across many of these traditions, there is a story-telling connection about good and evil. There was a once-common belief that human beings might offend God by making an earthly work too perfect and that evil traveled in straight lines. Quilters would turn fabric pieces around, upside-down and backwards to break monotonous patterns. Regina borrows African-American quilt-making traditions such as the use of improvisation, contrast, multiple patterns, and shifts in scale, thus breaking up straight lines in order to ward off evil. These techniques and traditions create movement, pattern recognition, and nostalgia.

To quilt is to stitch, sew, and design with one’s own two hands. Regina’s work translates the movement of color and design, combining ideas from the traditional art of quilting and high art into her own personal geometric, organic, three-dimensional work. Regina’s artistic practice is made up of experimentation with traditional needlework, colors, geometric patterns and textures. She learned many of her skills from her mother, who is an avid seamstress and knitter. After moving to Miami in 1999, she started quilting and sewing to express herself artistically. Regina’s pieces are influenced by and pay homage to the story-telling qualities in Americana quilts and how they can pass down skills and stories from generation to generation. One of the common themes across all of her work is that it is pattern-driven.

Regina Jestrow (b. 1978, Queens, NY) learned how to sew as a child and has been creating quilts since 1999. She graduated from High School of Art & Design and studied photography at Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. After moving to Miami, she purchased her first sewing machine. She began taking printmaking classes at Miami-Dade College and Florida International University, and started showing work in galleries in 2008. Regina was a resident artist at the Bakehouse Art Complex from 2009-2011, where she first started to explore installation art. In May 2011 she was awarded a month-long residency at The Studios of Key West where she completed her first outdoor interactive installation in their public garden. Regina had a studio at ArtCenter/South Florida from 2011-2013 where she became more interested in interactive and performance art. In November 2014 she will be the resident fellow at The Artist in Residence in the Everglades (AIRIE).

STOPING GROUNDS / BROKEN OPEN
Clara Varas and Jee Park

STOPING GROUNDS / BROKEN OPEN

Clara Varas and Jee Park

WANDA RAIMUNDO ORTIZ’S GUERILLAREINA /STEPHANIE CAFCULES’ FLUID DYNAMICS

FLUID DYNAMICS and GUERILLEREINA: NEW EXHIBITIONS

OPEN AT 6TH STREET CONTAINER GALLERY

Miami, FL- just in time for holiday vacationers and Art Basel Miami, Visual ArtistsStephanie Cafcules and Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz prepare for their solo exhibitions to be hosted at 6th Street Container Gallery.

Cafcules presents a new exhibition entities Fluid Dynamics, her continued investigation of altering synthetic materials and exploring the dynamism of painting into sculpture, and in the main gallery,

Raimundi-Ortiz presents GuerillerReina, the newest installment of her “Reinas”series.

The opening reception for these two energetic exhibitions is November15th, 2013 and will be open through December 12, 2013. Both Cafcules and Raimundi-Ortiz will be in attendance.

About Stephanie and Fluid Dynamics

Stephanie Cafcules is influenced by art history and inspired by textures andpatterns in nature. Transformation of synthetic materials either physically or chemically is a main process throughout her work. Her ‘Pour’ series focuses on poured paint as sculptural paintings and painterly sculptures. 

Stephanie Cafcules B. 1982 in Chicago is an emerging artist and MFA Candidate at the UCF’s School of Visual Art and Design. President of the Knights Association of Visual Artists Club, recipient of the South Eastern Art Conference travel grant in 2012, 2nd place in the Spring Exposition at Infinity Art Gallery, Honorable Mention in the Junk or Genius exhibition at Gallore Gallery and manager at Gallery 500 among others. She is currently a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the School of Visual Art and Design at the University of Central Florida.

About Wanda and GuerilleReina, the most recent addition to the REINA series, chamelion interdisciplinary artist Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz  assumes the persona of warrior queen GuerilleReina, interrogating notions of power, authority, and honor.

Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz is an award-winning interdisciplinary artist whose work spans video, performance art, installation, painting and spoken word. 

REPEATED MARKS

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Repeated Marks features the work of nine artists working in a range of different media. While no two artists work in the same media, threads of concept and narrative tie these artists together. Their works are an investigation to locate the individual in the intersection of time, place, and identity, and they invite the viewer to find their place among them as
well. This show seeks to engage the space of 6th Street Container in a manner that asks the viewer to consider not just the work in the frame, but the proximity and place.

Featuring the work of AdrienneRose Gionta, Andrew Horton, Gardner Cole Miller, Ivan Santiago, Joe Locke, Kristen O’Neil, Nick Gilmore, Stephanie Mora, Yasmin Khalaf.

MIAMI PROJECT - Kandy Lopez
A daughter of two parents from Dominican Republic who struggled and fought for their children in America, I was born in the small town of Bayonne, NJ and was raised in the hectic city of Miami, FL. Growing up as a female Dominican American in Miami was a struggle. At a young age I had to find a way to survive as an Afro-Latina female in a city populated by minorities.
Miami, Florida is my home. The media has portrayed it as a tourist destination of excitement and crazy entertainment but no one ever sees the “real” Miami. The Miami of poverty, drug violence, and political neglect. The Miami of oppression, racism, and prejudice. The “real” Miami informs my current body of work. 
This work should give a feeling of nostalgia for those who have been raised in these type of environments. It should also educate those who haven’t. The images are not about glorifying or idealizing the struggles but about educating the public of the reality. It is about living in a city and the struggles within it. This is a homage to my Miami

MIAMI PROJECT - Kandy Lopez

A daughter of two parents from Dominican Republic who struggled and fought for their children in America, I was born in the small town of Bayonne, NJ and was raised in the hectic city of Miami, FL. Growing up as a female Dominican American in Miami was a struggle. At a young age I had to find a way to survive as an Afro-Latina female in a city populated by minorities.
Miami, Florida is my home. The media has portrayed it as a tourist destination of excitement and crazy entertainment but no one ever sees the “real” Miami. The Miami of poverty, drug violence, and political neglect. The Miami of oppression, racism, and prejudice. The “real” Miami informs my current body of work. 
This work should give a feeling of nostalgia for those who have been raised in these type of environments. It should also educate those who haven’t. The images are not about glorifying or idealizing the struggles but about educating the public of the reality. It is about living in a city and the struggles within it. This is a homage to my Miami

HUGO FERNANDEZ’S WILFREDO SO FAR

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Hugo Fernandez’s Wilfredo So Far

“Wilfredo So Far…” represents digital images created over the last five years of documenting my 94 year-old father’s life. The project began, in some sense, 20 years ago, when I moved to New York to get to know him better, after about thirty years of absences, on his part, from my life. I had photographed him before, but in the last 10 years I had begun videotaping and audio recording his many stories about growing up in Cuba, the revolution and his exile. While he is quite the raconteur, whenever the machines would turn on he became more stayed and formal in his telling. As I became frustrated with the audio, I began filling in the time with the photographic. Not meant to be illustrative, the photos nevertheless capture his day-to-day, his joie de vivre, his anachronistic fashion sense, and his slow decline. Over the last five years he has experienced several near death illnesses, a few funerals, and the last days of his ability to live on his own in his New York apartment of the last 50 years. I hope to compile this work, and the work I can create with what is left of his days with us, along with my earlier photos of him and photos from my family archive, into a written narrative, a comprehensive telling of a long and complicated life.

Kelly Sturhahn - Transient Patterns

KELLY STURHANHN - TRANSIENT PATTERNS

The 6th Street Container Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition by artist, Kelly Sturhahn. Sturhahn’s work explores traditional themes of the sublime in nature with contemporary reflection, simultaneously considering experience, perception and transformation. As an artist in New York City, she became drawn to the work of the Romantics and the Hudson River School, and their appreciation of art and nature. Utilizing multiple media, Sturhahn pushes conventional boundaries to convey her ideas, creating new, authentic forms. In her works on paper, she responds to source imagery, emphasizing what might be referred to as photographic flaws, such as lens flare, blur or pixilation. Her expressive use of ink and wash results in exquisite works that are at once a commentary on painting traditions and a record of her personal journey. In her installations, Sturhahn employs intricate craft techniques and tactile materials such as lace and sequins, activating space on a grand scale. Light, nature, photography, textiles and architecture intertwine, transforming the awe-inspiring qualities of nature, into an experiential, dream-like realm. Sturhahn’s work freely recalls Pattern and Decoration, Minimalism, and Op Art among other movements, and probes the significance of the aesthetic origins therein.
For this exhibition, Sturhahn will present two interactive installations, along with several paintings and works on paper. Taking inspiration from the Florida landscape, her work incorporates refracted sunlight, pouring rain and mercurial bodies of water that traverse multiple dimensions. Upon entering the gallery, prepare to be transported by Night Fall, an interactive installation comprised of black lace and hundreds of hand-sewn sequins. In Sturhahn’s second installation, Achromatic Rainbow, white lace painted in atmospheric values takes the form of an overhanging arc that spans the width of the gallery. Her textile-based paintings display black and white striped fabric that has been variously altered by cutting, slicing, painting and sewing processes, disrupting the perpetuity of the original pattern. Sturhahn’s works on paper reinvigorate the landscape with abstracted impressions, void of horizons, and inventive approaches in ink and wash. With experimental intuitiveness, patterns and imagery cycle through refinement, distortion and reinvention: lace takes on architectural space; sliced stripes vibrate optically, and inky impressions negotiate gravity. Sturhahn’s unique interpretations allow us to perceive our environment in unexpected, refreshing ways.
About the Artist:
Kelly Sturhahn is a New York and Florida based artist. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Ringling College of Art and Design in Florida, and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Hunter College in New York. After graduate school, Sturhahn continued to live and work in the thriving art community, Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Sturhahn’s work has been widely exhibited in galleries and museums throughout the United States. Highlights include solo projects in New York at Ann Street Gallery, Skylight Gallery, Saratoga Arts Center, and Times Square Gallery; and in Florida at Melvin Art Gallery. Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions at the Boca Raton Museum of Art; The Space/Fardom Gallery, Long Island City; Hudson Guild, New York; Garbageman Astronaut Space, Portland; Skylight Gallery, Keene Valley; Artists Space, New York; and Jack the Pelican Presents, Brooklyn, among others. She has also been featured at international art fairs including Scope in New York and Grendel Miami during Art Basel. Her artwork may be found in private collections throughout the United States. Recently, Sturhahn was honored to be a Visiting Artist and Lecturer at Ringling College of Art and Design in Florida, and an Artist-in-Residence and grant recipient at both the Vermont Studio Center (Johnson, VT), and Salem Art Works (Salem, NY). Sturhahn is currently Assistant Professor of Art and Foundations Program Director at Florida Southern College.